Sun and Moon Observational Data

Sun

Earth

Moon

Live NASA Sun Image

Today's Sun image from  Goddard Space Center

Current Sunlit Earth With Live Cloud Cover

Live USNO Moon Image

Today's Moon illumination from Naval Observatory

Sunrise: 06:58
Sunset: 17:39
Daylight: 10:41:00
Current Sunlit Earth
With Live Cloud Cover
Moonrise: 12:24
Moonset: 03:23
Waxing Gibbous Moon
70% Illuminated


First Quarter Moon Full Moon Last Quarter Moon New Moon
First Quarter Moon Full Moon Last Quarter Moon New Moon
23/02/2018 08:10
08:10 UTC 23 February 2018
02/03/2018 00:52
00:52 UTC 2 March 2018
09/03/2018 11:21
11:21 UTC 9 March 2018
17/03/2018 13:12
13:12 UTC 17 March 2018


Vernal Equinox
Start of Spring
Summer Solstice
Start of Summer
Autumn Equinox
Start of Autumn
Winter Solstice
Start of Winter
Start of Spring First day of Summer First day of Fall First day of Winter
20/03/2018 16:16
16:16 UTC 20 March 2018
21/06/2018 11:08
10:08 UTC 21 June 2018
23/09/2018 02:55
01:55 UTC 23 September 2018
21/12/2018 22:23
22:23 UTC 21 December 2018

 
Moon Details from Weather-Display


Additional Moon facts from Weather-Display


Current Position of Day and Night Regions - World Sunlight Map

The World Sunlight Map provides a computer-generated approximation of what the earth currently looks like.
While less impressive than actually being into orbit, this is much more accessible to most of us.

We start with cloudless images of the earth during the day (from a pair of NASA satellites) and night (from a DoD program to map city lights). Every 3 hours, we download a composite cloud image based on data from weather satellites all over the world. And every half hour, these images are composited and mapped onto a sphere by xplanet according to the relative position of the sun. The flat maps are post-processed by ImageMagick to cut off the 15 degrees nearest the north and south poles where cloud data is unavailable.

Composite Image of the Moon - Current Phase Map

Moon Phase provides a computer-generated approximation of what the moon currently looks like.
While less impressive than the real thing, it doesn't require waiting for a cloudless night.

It is based on a composite image of the moon made up of data from various satellites. Every hour, this image is mapped onto a sphere and shaded by xplanet according to the current positions of the earth and moon, then post-processed by ImageMagick to remove some visible artifacts.